Quotes from "With the Century",

Reminiscences of Kim Il Sung




With the Century 1



  - Revolutionaries, believe in the people and rely on them at all times and you shall always emerge victorious; if you are forsaken by them, you will always fail. Let this be your maxim in your life and struggle. (Volume 1)

  - "The people are my God" has been my constant view and motto. The principle of Juche, which calls for drawing on the strength of the masses who are the masters of the revolution and construction, is my political creed. This has been the axiom that has led me to devote my whole life to the people.(Volume 1, Preface)

  - "We can live without money, but not without humanity," was what my grandfather used to say when admonishing his sons and daughters. This was the philosophy of my family.(Volume 1, Chapter 1 The Country in Distress, 1. My Family)

  - My grandfather, who used to say, "A man should die fighting the enemy on the battlefield," always told his family to live honorably for their country and he offered his children unhesitatingly to the revolutionary struggle.(Volume 1, Chapter 1 The Country in Distress, 1. My Family)

  - In a ruined country neither the land nor the people can remain at peace. Under the roofs of houses in a ruined country even the traitors who live in luxury as a reward for betraying their country will not be able to sleep in peace. Even though they are alive, the people are worse than gutter dogs, and even if the mountains and rivers remain the same, they will not retain their beauty.
   A man who perceives this truth before others is called a forerunner; he who struggles against difficulties to save his country from tragedy is called a patriot; and he who sets fire to himself to demonstrate the truth and overthrows the unjust society by rousing the people to action is called a revolutionary. (Volume 1, Chapter 1 The Country in Distress, 1. My Family)

  - "Aim High!" means what it says.
"Aim High!" has nothing in common with worldly preaching about personal glory or a successful career; it implies a revolutionary outlook on life in which genuine happiness is sought in the struggle for one's country and nation, and an unbreakable revolutionary spirit to liberate the country by fighting through the generations. (Volume 1, Chapter 1 The Country in Distress, 2. My Father and the Korean National Association)

  - Once my father said to my grandparents, "What is the use of living if I cannot win my country's independence? Even if I am to be torn to pieces I must fight and defeat the Japanese. If I fall in battle, my son will continue the fight; if my son cannot accomplish the cause, my grandson must fight until we win our nation's independence." (Volume 1, Chapter 1 The Country in Distress, 2. My Father and the Korean National Association)

  - "Learn to read and write for Korea's sake! Learn technology also for Korea's sake! Believe in a Korean God, if you believe in one!", my father used to say to his schoolmates as he rallied the young patriots and pupils together. (Volume 1, Chapter 1 The Country in Distress, 2. My Father and the Korean National Association)

  - There is no historical precedent for a major power to sympathize with a small country and give freedom and independence to the people of a weak country. The sovereignty of a nation can be achieved and preserved only through the independent efforts and indomitable struggle of that nation. This is a truth which has been proved through many centuries and generations. (Volume 1, Chapter 1 The Country in Distress, 3. An Echo of Cheers for Independence)

  - Man experiences many sorrows in his lifetime. The greatest of them is the sorrow of leaving one's country as a stateless person. However great a sorrow one feels when leaving one's birthplace, it cannot be compared with the sorrow one experiences when leaving one's homeland. If a birthplace can be likened to a mother and a place away from home, to a stepmother, I wonder what a foreign country which is far stranger can be likened to. (Volume 1, Chapter 1 The Country in Distress, 4. Repeated Removal)

  - A revolution is not conducted by a few special people alone. If awakened ideologically and placed under a good influence, anyone is capable of rendering distinguished service in the revolutionary struggle for the remolding of the world. (Volume 1, Chapter 1 The Country in Distress, 4. Repeated Removal)

  - Though living in poverty as a ruined nation, the Korean people still preserved their traditional fellowship and beautiful customs. Up until the turn of the century there were many people traveling without money in our country. Villagers used to provide free accommodation for travelers. This was a Korean custom, which was the envy of the people of the West. My journey made me realize that the Korean people were truly kind-hearted and morally excellent. (Volume 1, Chapter 1 The Country in Distress, 5. The Song of the River Amnok)

  - Money cannot buy friendship, but friendship can produce money and everything else. (Volume 1, Chapter 1 The Country in Distress, 5. The Song of the River Amnok)

  - My most valuable experience was to have acquired a deep understanding of our people. Our people were simple, and industrious yet brave and strong-willed. They were staunch people who did not yield, whatever the adversity or hardship; they were polite and kindhearted and yet resolute and uncompromising against injustice. (Volume 1, Chapter 1 The Country in Distress, 5. The Song of the River Amnok)

  - I thought: My dear Korea, I am leaving you. I know I cannot live even for a moment away from you, but I am crossing the Amnok to win you back. Across this river is a foreign land, but I will not forget you, even in there. Wait for me, my Korea.
   Then I sang the song again. As I sang this song, I wondered when I would be able to tread this land again, when I would return to this land where I grew up and where my forefathers' graves lay. Young as I was, I could not repress my sorrow at this thought. Picturing in my mind the miserable reality of the motherland, I made a grim resolve not to return before Korea had become independent. (Volume 1, Chapter 1 The Country in Distress, 5. The Song of the River Amnok)

  - Poor as she was, she was not mean.
   She used to say, "A man dies not because he hasn't money but because he is mortal. Money changes hands." That was her philosophy. (Volume 1, Chapter 1 The Country in Distress, 6. My Mother)

  - No love in the world can be so warm, so true and so eternal as maternal love. Even if a mother scolds or beats her children, she does not hurt them; she loves them. Her love can bring down a star from the sky if it is for her children. A mother's love knows no reward. (Volume 1, Chapter 1 The Country in Distress, 6. My Mother)

  - One thing I cannot forget to this day is his remark about how a revolutionary should be prepared for three contingencies.
"Wherever he may go, a revolutionary must always be prepared for three contingencies. He must be prepared for death from hunger, death from a beating and death from the cold; yet he must stick to the high aim he set himself at the outset." I engraved these words of my father deep on my heart. (Volume 1, Chapter 1 The Country in Distress, 7. The Inheritance)

  - His remarks about friends and friendship were also instructive.
"A man must not forget the friends he has gained in adversity. One must rely on one's parents at home and on one's friends outside; that is what is traditionally said, and it is an important saying. True friends who will be one's partners through thick and thin are dearer than one's brothers." (Volume 1, Chapter 1 The Country in Distress, 7. The Inheritance)

  - "Only he who will die for the sake of his comrades will find good comrades." Still now this teaching given me by my father remains deeply impressed on my mind. (Volume 1, Chapter 1 The Country in Distress, 7. The Inheritance)

  - The thought of "Aim High," being prepared for the three contingencies, the idea of gaining comrades, and two pistols-this was all I received from my father. My heritage was such that it portended great hardship and sacrifice for me. Nevertheless, there could be no better heritage for me. (Volume 1, Chapter 1 The Country in Distress, 7. The Inheritance)

  - As a man's idea is the basic criterion for defining his value, so its educational ideology is the basic criterion for determining the value of a school and its education. (Volume 1, Chapter 2 Unforgettable Huadian, 3. The Down-with-Imperialism Union)

  - My father had always said that one should have reliable comrades and many of them. He also said that a man who had a just and wonderful aim could not attain it if he had no comrades with whom he could share his fate. I always remembered his teachings. (Volume 1, Chapter 2 Unforgettable Huadian, 3. The Down-with-Imperialism Union)

  - Capitalists say they take great pleasure in making money, but I took the greatest pleasure and interest in making comrades. How can we compare the happiness a man feels when he has won a comrade to the delight a man feels when he has obtained a piece of gold! Thus my struggle to win comrades started at Hwasong Uisuk School. Since then I have devoted my whole life to gaining comrades. (Volume 1, Chapter 2 Unforgettable Huadian, 3. The Down-with-Imperialism Union)

  - In the history of our Party the DIU is recognized as the root of the Party, and the formation of the DIU as a starting-point or the genesis of the Korean communist movement and the Korean revolution. From this root came the program of our Party, the principles for building our Party and its activities, and the backbone for its foundation. With the formation of the DIU our revolution advanced on the basis of the principle of independence. (Volume 1, Chapter 2 Unforgettable Huadian, 3. The Down-with-Imperialism Union)

  - Only those who have devoted themselves body and soul to the country, weeping, laughing and bleeding, can truly realize how dear their homeland is to them. (Volume 1, Chapter 2 Unforgettable Huadian, 5. Ri Kwan Rin, Heroine of the Independence Army)

  - If you read a book carefully without losing sight of its essential point, you can seize its substance clearly no matter how complicated it may be and you can read many books in a short time. (Volume 1, Chapter 3 In Jilin, 1. The Pursuit of Progressive Thoughts)

  - It was not simply out of academic interest or from a spirit of inquiry that I spent night after night reading in my secondary school days. I did not delve into the books with the object of becoming a scholar or for the purposes of a career. How could we expel the Japanese imperialists and win back our country? How could we do away with social inequality and make the working people prosperous? These were the questions the answers to which I wanted to discover in the books. No matter what book I was reading and where, I was always seeking the answers to these questions. I am sure it was in the course of this that my position was established of approaching Marxism-Leninism not as a dogma but as a practical weapon and of searching for the truth not in an abstract theory but always in the practice of the Korean revolution. In those days I read The Communist Manifesto, The Capital, The State and Revolution, Wage Labor and Capital and other Marxist-Leninist classics and books expounding them which I came across. (Volume 1, Chapter 3 In Jilin, 1. The Pursuit of Progressive Thoughts)

  - A man can be said to have established his revolutionary world view when he becomes aware of his class position and interests, hates the exploiting classes, is prepared to safeguard the interests of his class and then embarks on the path of revolution with a determination to build a new society. I began to realize my class position through reading the Marxist-Leninist classics and other revolutionary books, became aware of many inequalities by observing social phenomena, conceived a growing hatred for the exploiting classes and exploiter society and, in the end, embarked on the road of struggle with a resolve to reform and rebuild the world. (Volume 1, Chapter 3 In Jilin, 1. The Pursuit of Progressive Thoughts)

  - A theory is born of practice and its accuracy is verified through practice. The practice we are not allowed to lose sight of even for a moment consists of the independence of Korea and the welfare of our people. (Volume 1, Chapter 3 In Jilin, 1. The Pursuit of Progressive Thoughts)

  - Study is a basic process for the self-culture of revolutionaries and represents an essential mental endeavor that must never be suspended even for a single day in laying the groundwork for achieving social progress and reform. Proceeding from the lesson learned in the process of pursuing progressive ideologies in Jilin, I emphasize even now that study is the first duty of a revolutionary. (Volume 1, Chapter 3 In Jilin, 1. The Pursuit of Progressive Thoughts)

  - Can a difference in nationalities change people's feelings? Friendship knows no barrier of skin color, language and religion. (Volume 1, Chapter 3 In Jilin, 2. Mentor Shang Yue)

  - We defined the young people and students as constituting the fully-fledged main force of the revolution, thus breaking away from the old viewpoint according to which the motive force of the revolution had been defined with the main emphasis on the workers and peasants. This is proved to be correct by the course of the youth and student movement. (Volume 1, Chapter 3 In Jilin, 3. The Young Communist League of Korea)

  - We opened a new history of the communist movement on the strength of the youth and waged the 15-year-long anti-Japanese armed struggle with young people and students as the backbone. Today, too, young people and students are fulfilling the role of the shock brigade in our revolution. (Volume 1, Chapter 3 In Jilin, 3. The Young Communist League of Korea)

  - In working among the young people and children, we applied different forms and methods to suit their tastes and ideological levels. (Volume 1, Chapter 3 In Jilin, 3. The Young Communist League of Korea)

  - We made every possible effort to make the masses revolutionary. We did so because we had broken with the old way of thinking that the masses were only ignorant and uncivilized people who needed enlightenment; we held the view that the people were our teachers and the main motive force behind the revolution, and we made this view our absolute belief. With this point of view we went among the people.
   "Go among the people!"
   From that time on this became my motto throughout my life. (Volume 1, Chapter 3 In Jilin, 4. The Expansion of the Organization)

  - I started my revolutionary activities by going among the people and today, too, I am continuing to make the revolution by mixing with the people. I am also reviewing my life by going among the people. (Volume 1, Chapter 3 In Jilin, 4. The Expansion of the Organization)

  - A youth who has no dream, no courage, no ardor, no aspiration, no fighting spirit and no romance is not a youth. In one's youth one must have a noble ideal and fight stubbornly to realize it whatever the difficulties. All the fruits which young people, who possess fresh ideas and a healthy and strong body, have cultivated and plucked at the cost of their sweat and blood are valuable wealth for the country. The people never forget the heroes who have created this wealth.
A man in his latter years misses his youth because his youth is the period of his life when he can do most work. A man is happiest when he can do a lot of work. (Volume 1, Chapter 3 In Jilin, 4. The Expansion of the Organization)

  - As it is so now, so in those days, too, our teacher was the people.
   Therefore, whenever I meet officials I tell them earnestly to go among the people. I always emphasize that going among the people is like taking a tonic and that failing to do so is like taking poison. One can find such people as old man Cha Cholli only when one mixes with the people. One finds philosophy, literature and political economy among the people. (Volume 1, Chapter 3 In Jilin, 4. The Expansion of the Organization)

  - It is never possible to possess a popular personality and a popular way of thinking that conform to the interests of the people if one only sits at one's desk. Nor can one possess them by indulging in empty talk. They can be attained only through direct contact with the people to enable one to see and apprehend personally, with one's own eyes and ears, the feelings of the people, their glances, their countenance, their manner of speaking, their gestures and their behavior, not to mention their voice. (Volume 1, Chapter 3 In Jilin, 4. The Expansion of the Organization)

  - It can be said that the life of a revolutionary begins by going among the masses and that it is over when he parts from them. (Volume 1, Chapter 3 In Jilin, 4. The Expansion of the Organization)

  - It can be said that for revolutionaries the prison is a theatre of struggle. If one regards prison merely as a lockup for prisoners, one will lose the initiative and be unable to do anything. But if one thinks of it as a part of the world, one will be able to do something beneficial for the revolution even in a narrow walled-in space. (Volume 1, Chapter 3 In Jilin, 10. Behind Bars)

  - I believed that the revolution in our country would emerge victorious only when it was undertaken on our own responsibility and by the efforts of our own people, and that all the problems arising in the revolution must be solved independently and creatively. This was the starting-point of the Juche idea, as it is known nowadays. (Volume 1, Chapter 3 In Jilin, 10. Behind Bars)




With the Century 2



  - The destiny of a nation can be saved only through the unity and struggle of all the forces that love their country and treasure their nation. (Volume 2)

  - Friendship is much stronger than the passage of time. The passage of time can make everything fade away, but not friendship. True friendship and true love neither grow weaker with age or stale. (Volume 2, Chapter 4 Seeking a New Path, 1. The Rev. Son Jong Do)

  - The saber-rattling enemy compelled the Korean nation to take up arms. Arms had to be countered with arms. (Volume 2, Chapter 4 Seeking a New Path, 2. A Spring of Trials)

  - But the question had arisen of the policy of struggle and the leadership. I had the firm conviction that we could defeat any enemy, however powerful, if we had a correct policy that suited the trend of the times, and led the struggle properly. (Volume 2, Chapter 4 Seeking a New Path, 2. A Spring of Trials)

  - I think it was a turning point in my life when I left school and went among the popular masses. It was at this time that my underground activities and my new life as a career revolutionary started. (Volume 2, Chapter 4 Seeking a New Path, 2. A Spring of Trials)

  - We became convinced that if a party was founded and the right guiding theory was advanced it would be fully possible to rouse the people and emerge victorious in the struggle against the Japanese imperialists. (Volume 2, Chapter 4 Seeking a New Path, 3. The Kalun Meeting)

  - Generally speaking, the common weak point of the strategies and lines of the preceding generation was that they did not believe in the strength of the masses and turned away from them.
   The movement champions from the preceding generation all ignored the fact that the people are the masters of the revolution and the motive force of the revolution. (Volume 2, Chapter 4 Seeking a New Path, 3. The Kalun Meeting)

  - I was convinced that an armed struggle led by communists alone could wage a thorough anti-Japanese war of resistance and be revolutionary. This was because communists alone could rally in their armed ranks workers, peasants and other broad sections of the anti-Japanese patriotic forces and lead the Korean revolution as a whole to victory, taking charge of and waging the noble war by employing scientific tactics and strategies which would accurately reflect the interests of the masses. (Volume 2, Chapter 4 Seeking a New Path, 3. The Kalun Meeting)

  - We maintained that in the pure class struggle the workers and the peasant masses alone could be the motive force of the revolution, but since by its nature the Korean revolution was a revolution against feudalism and imperialism not only the workers and peasants but also the young people and students, intellectuals, patriotic-minded men of religion, and non-comprador capitalists could be the motive force of the revolution. Ours was the principle of rallying and enlisting all the anti-Japanese patriotic forces interested in national liberation. (Volume 2, Chapter 4 Seeking a New Path, 3. The Kalun Meeting)

  - Politics must be comprehensive and statesmen, broad-minded. If politics is not comprehensive, it cannot embrace all the people. If statesmen are not broad-minded, the people turn away from them. (Volume 2, Chapter 4 Seeking a New Path, 3. The Kalun Meeting)

  - We characterized the Korean revolution as an anti-imperialist, anti-feudal democratic revolution on the basis of the conclusion we had formed concerning the class relations prevailing in our country and the tasks facing our revolution. The most urgent revolutionary task for the Korean nation was to overthrow Japanese imperialism, eliminate the feudal relations shackling our people and effect democracy in our country. Hence we defined the Korean revolution as an anti-imperialist, anti-feudal democratic revolution. (Volume 2, Chapter 4 Seeking a New Path, 3. The Kalun Meeting)

  - If one squeezes the definition of the revolution into another pattern, one will be guilty of dogmatism. It is not the pattern that is most important but the actual situation. Communists should accept without hesitation a scientific definition suited to the actual situation in the country even if it is not found in the classics or elsewhere. This represents a creative attitude towards Marxism-Leninism. (Volume 2, Chapter 4 Seeking a New Path, 3. The Kalun Meeting)

  - We could defeat the strong enemy who was armed to the teeth, fighting against him in the severe cold of up to 40 degrees below zero in Manchuria for over 15 years, because we had a mighty fortress called the people and the boundless ocean called the masses. (Volume 2, Chapter 4 Seeking a New Path, 3. The Kalun Meeting)

  - It is known to everyone that the party plays the role of the general staff in the revolution and that victory in the revolution depends on the role of the party. If the revolution is the locomotive of history, the party can be called the locomotive of the revolution. This is the reason why revolutionaries attach importance to the party and work heart and soul to build up the party. (Volume 2, Chapter 4 Seeking a New Path, 4. The First Party Organization-the Society for Rallying Comrades)

  - I considered that forming the party by setting up basic party organizations first, with communists of the new generation, who had nothing to do with factions, as the backbone and then steadily expanding them, was the most suitable and realistic method for us of founding a party. (Volume 2, Chapter 4 Seeking a New Path, 4. The First Party Organization-the Society for Rallying Comrades)

  - The formation of the DIU was the starting point for the founding of a new type of revolutionary party which differed from the previous party in the Korean communist movement. Everything started from the DIU. The DIU developed into the Anti-Imperialist Youth League and then the Young Communist League.
The hardcore detachment of our revolution trained by the Young Communist League and the mass foundation of our revolution laid by the Anti-Imperialist Youth League immediately became the basis for founding the party. (Volume 2, Chapter 4 Seeking a New Path, 4. The First Party Organization-the Society for Rallying Comrades)

  - The guiding idea, leadership core and mass foundation-these can be said to be the essential elements for the formation of a party organization. (Volume 2, Chapter 4 Seeking a New Path, 4. The First Party Organization-the Society for Rallying Comrades)

  - We gave the first party organization the simple name of the Society for Rallying Comrades. That name embodied the high aims and will of us who were taking the first step in the revolution by winning over comrades, and who were determined to develop the revolution in depth and achieve its final victory by continually discovering and rallying those comrades who would share their fate with us. (Volume 2, Chapter 4 Seeking a New Path, 4. The First Party Organization-the Society for Rallying Comrades)

  - The first party organization-the Society for Rallying Comrades- was the embryo and seed of our Party; it was an organization with the importance of a parent body in forming and expanding the basic organizations of the party. Since acquiring its first party organization our revolution has been winning victory after victory under the leadership of the communists from the new generation who have not been influenced by factions and are as pure and fresh as driven snow. (Volume 2, Chapter 4 Seeking a New Path, 4. The First Party Organization-the Society for Rallying Comrades)

  - A revolution is naturally an undertaking that is launched independently in accordance with one's own conviction and aim, not at the dictation of somebody else. Therefore, we ourselves evolved the guiding ideology for our revolution and formed the DIU, the genesis of our Party, independently. (Volume 2, Chapter 4 Seeking a New Path, 4. The First Party Organization-the Society for Rallying Comrades)

  - A revolution begins with the recruiting of comrades. For a capitalist money is capital; for a revolutionary the people are the source of his strength. A capitalist builds up a fortune in money, whereas a revolutionary changes and transforms the society by drawing on the efforts of his comrades. (Volume 2, Chapter 4 Seeking a New Path, 6. Revolutionary Poet Kim Hyok)

  - They upheld me with such enthusiasm in spite of the fact that I was much younger than they were and my record of struggle was short, because they had learned a serious lesson from the movement of the previous generation in which various parties and factions, behaving as if they alone were heroes, and without a center of unity and solidarity, ruined the revolutionary movement through factional strife, and because they had felt to the marrow of their bones that in order to win back the country the twenty million Korean people must unite, and that in order to unite in mind and purpose they must have a center of leadership, a center of unity. (Volume 2, Chapter 4 Seeking a New Path, 6. Revolutionary Poet Kim Hyok)

  - The noble and beautiful spirit of the communists of that generation who upheld their leader and united behind him has become a great tradition of unity which is now called single-hearted unity by our Party. (Volume 2, Chapter 4 Seeking a New Path, 6. Revolutionary Poet Kim Hyok)

  - From the days when the young communists, upholding their leader and united behind him in mind and purpose, developed the revolutionary struggle, the national liberation struggle in Korea put an end to factional strife and confusion, and began a new chapter. (Volume 2, Chapter 4 Seeking a New Path, 6. Revolutionary Poet Kim Hyok)

  - When people from rich families discover contradictions that suppress a man's independence and check social development, they may be ready to take part in the revolutionary movement to do away with those contradictions. That is why fighters and pioneers defending the interests of the working people are also produced from the propertied classes, I think. What is important is not one's class origin but one's world outlook. If a man regards life as enjoyment he cannot make the revolution and merely tries to live in clover. If a man prefers a life worthy of a man, he, even if he is rich, takes part in the revolution. (Volume 2, Chapter 4 Seeking a New Path, 7. The Summer of 1930)

  - If an ideological mood and faith change, the sense of friendship and of humanity changes. If one of two people who had been on intimate terms with each other in the past, sharing joy and hardship, changes his mind, their friendship is impaired and they part. Friendship which was supposed to be invariable and eternal is impaired if one side degenerates ideologically. Later in the course of the protracted revolutionary struggle I learned the lesson that without holding fast to an idea it is impossible to maintain a sense of duty as a friend and friendly relations. (Volume 2, Chapter 4 Seeking a New Path, 7. The Summer of 1930)

  - A person reveals his true worth in adversity. (Volume 2, Chapter 4 Seeking a New Path, 7. The Summer of 1930)

  - An unstained and sound sense of duty as a comrade to which revolutionaries could entrust their lives without hesitation was found among the working people. So, I always told my comrades-in-arms to go to the people when difficulties arose while making the revolution. I told them to call on the people when they were hungry or thirsty and when misfortune befell them. (Volume 2, Chapter 4 Seeking a New Path, 7. The Summer of 1930)

  - When he was told about a good man, my father covered any distance, however long, no matter where he might be, joined hands with him at any cost and won him over as a like-minded man. He taught me that talented people decided everything and that the victory of revolutionary work depended on how many genuine comrades were won over. In those days I did not mind going hungry for three days, or even ten days, if only I could win over a like-minded man. (Volume 2, Chapter 4 Seeking a New Path, 8. Crossing the River Tuman)

  - The life of a revolutionary can be said to begin with his going among the masses and the failure of the revolution with a failure to believe in the strength of the popular masses and a neglect of mixing with them. (Volume 2, Chapter 4 Seeking a New Path, 8. Crossing the River Duman)

  - It is impossible to make the revolution with only a few people from a good class origin. You should boldly believe in the masses and keep the door to the organization wide open for them. (Volume 2, Chapter 4 Seeking a New Path, 8. Crossing the River Duman)

  - We could emerge victorious, even though we had started the struggle empty-handed, solely because the people trusted and supported us. (Volume 2, Chapter 4 Seeking a New Path, 10. Unforgettable Men and Women)

  - The cause of the previous generation is not inherited naturally by the children of the same stock. Only when the younger generations know all about the distinguished service rendered by their forerunners and its value, can they inherit the revolutionary cause begun by their grandfathers' and fathers' generations. (Volume 2, Chapter 4 Seeking a New Path, 10. Unforgettable Men and Women)

  - I consider it my best payment and gift to them to make the people prosperous, promote the well-being of the people and carry out the revolution initiated with the support of the people. Until he has made such a contribution to the people, nobody can say that he has fulfilled his duty as a communist. (Volume 2, Chapter 4 Seeking a New Path, 10. Unforgettable Men and Women)

  - What could be sadder for the fighters who were devoted to the people than to be forsaken by the people, who had given birth to them? If a revolutionary should forfeit the people's confidence and support even for a single day, he can scarcely be regarded as a living man. (Volume 2, Chapter 5 People in Arms, 1. The Earth in Agony)

  - It is common knowledge that the peace of the country is a prerequisite to peace at home. It is a rule that national tragedy will inevitably affect the millions of families that make up the nation. Therefore, to safeguard the peace and happiness of families it is necessary to safeguard the country; and to safeguard the country, everyone must faithfully discharge his duties as a citizen. (Volume 2, Chapter 5 People in Arms, 1. The Earth in Agony)

  - Love for his family constitutes a motive force which prompts a revolutionary to the struggle. When his love for his family cools, his enthusiasm for the struggle will cool also. (Volume 2, Chapter 5 People in Arms, 1. The Earth in Agony)

  - The power of the organized masses was truly unlimited and there could be no such word as impossible for this power. (Volume 2, Chapter 5 People in Arms, 1. The Earth in Agony)

  - Some say that history is a sequence of non-repetitive events, but we cannot entirely ignore the similarity and common trends existing in different events. (Volume 2, Chapter 5 People in Arms, 1. The Earth in Agony)

  - Only violence which is just, well-advised and timely and is used for a just purpose can promise victory for those who use it. Only such violence can make a genuine contribution to the transformation of society and the development of history. We support only such violence. (Volume 2, Chapter 5 People in Arms, 3. To Oppose Armed Force with Armed Force)

  - Guerrilla warfare is a method of armed struggle with which one can deal heavy political and military blows to the enemy while preserving one's own forces and annihilate, with a small force, an enemy who is superior both in numbers and equipment. (Volume 2, Chapter 5 People in Arms, 3. To Oppose Armed Force with Armed Force)

  - In the national liberation revolution in colonies it is impossible to make people take up arms by means such as a mobilization order or a system of obligatory military service. In the revolution the appeal of the leader of the revolution or farsighted people replaces the law, and the political and moral awareness and militant enthusiasm of each man decides his voluntary entry into the army. (Volume 2, Chapter 5 People in Arms, 3. To Oppose Armed Force with Armed Force)

  - The masses take up arms for their liberation of their own accord without the request or direction of anyone else. It is an act natural to the people who regard independence as their lifeblood and are ready to devote their lives to it. (Volume 2, Chapter 5 People in Arms, 3. To Oppose Armed Force with Armed Force)

  - It is difficult, even impossible, for a man to lose sight of his family on the ground that he is making the revolution. The revolution is for the benefit of man, so how could revolutionaries ignore their families and remain indifferent to the fate of their parents and wives and children? We have always regarded the welfare of our families and the destiny of our country as one and the same. When the country is in distress, families cannot remain in peace, and when the families are overshadowed by misfortunes, the country will also be afflicted. This is our theory. (Volume 2, Chapter 6 The Year of Trials, 2. The Last Image)

  - We revolutionaries who tread a thorny path, allaying our hunger by licking a snowball and sleeping in the open, can feel pleasure that the bourgeoisie and philistines can never feel. It is the spiritual fullness we experience when we gain new comrades-in-arms. When new comrades joined us, ready to lay down their lives, and when we helped them put on their uniforms and shoulder their guns, we felt an ennobling and thrilling joy that could never be experienced in the mundane world. We believed the joy to be unique to us. (Volume 2, Chapter 6 The Year of Trials, 3. Joy and Sorrow)

  - It needs painstaking efforts to gain comrades who have the same idea and purpose with us or to recruit comrades-in-arms who will share life and death with us and to rally them in an organized force. (Volume 2, Chapter 6 The Year of Trials, 3. Joy and Sorrow)

  - No feeling in the world is greater, more ennobling and more sacred than patriotism. The spirit of national unity can be called the lifeblood and essence of patriotism. The Korean communists, since the first day they set sail for national liberation, have invariably been holding the idea of national unity dear at all times and in all places, and have not been sparing in their efforts to make the idea the reality. (Volume 2, Chapter 6 The Year of Trials, 5. With an Ideal of Unity)

  - The love she showed me was not simply motherly love. It was true revolutionary affection with which she regarded me as the son of the nation rather than her own son and awakened me to the need to give priority to loyalty to the country over filial piety towards my parents. Her whole life served as a textbook for me in implanting in me a true view on life and on the revolution. (Volume 2, Chapter 6 The Year of Trials, 7. Autumn in Xiaoshahe)

  - If my father could be compared to a teacher who implanted in me the indomitable revolutionary spirit of fighting through the generations and achieving national liberation, my mother was a kind teacher who taught me that a man who has embarked on the revolution should strive to the end to achieve his set aim without being swayed by temporary sentiments or whims. (Volume 2, Chapter 6 The Year of Trials, 7. Autumn in Xiaoshahe)

  - If love between a parent and child is blind, it cannot be called solid love. Only when the spirit underlying the love is sound and noble can love be eternal and sacred. (Volume 2, Chapter 6 The Year of Trials, 7. Autumn in Xiaoshahe)

  - Man is called the lord of all creation precisely because he has the unique ability to adjust, and revolutionaries are looked upon as great people because they are strong-willed, creative and selfless people who are capable of producing the things they need from nothing and turning an adverse tide to their advantage. (Volume 2, Chapter 6 The Year of Trials, 8. On the Heights of Luozigou)
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Index